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BBC World News America

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U.s. 9, Damascus 5, Syria 5, Clinton 4, Daniel Tiger 3, Christine Lagarde 3, Egypt 3, America 3, United States 2, Nasa 2, Obama 2, Pbs 2, New York 2, Us 2, Cambridge 2, Europe 2, Cairo 2, Washington 2, Bbc World News America 1, Apollo 1,
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  PBS    BBC World News America    News/Business. U.S.-targeted  
   nightly newscast. (CC) (Stereo)  

    December 7, 2012
    4:00 - 4:30pm PST  

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viewers on public television in america. in a tragic turn of events, the nurse who took a prank call from two australian deejays about the duchess of cambridge has been found dead. a hospital, where she is treated earlier this week, said she was a well-respected member of their staff who had been the victim of a hoax. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> it was a call to a hospital three days ago which its makers thought would be funny. at 9:30, police were called to an accommodation near the hospital where they found the body of jacintah saldanha. >> she was the victim of a hoax call to the hospital. a hospital had been supporting her through this difficult time.
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jacintha cared diligently for hundreds of patients during her time with us. everyone is shocked by the loss of a much loved and a valued colleague. >> in a statement, a spokesman said the duke and duchess were deeply saddened to learn of the death of saldanha. "they were looked after so wonderfully well at all times. their thoughts and prayers are family andnha's friends." the call was made by two austrian radio presenters. they work for a sydney radio station. the station has offered its deepest sympathies. the presenters will not be returning to the station until further notice. nurse saldanha was on night duty at the hospital last monday night.
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the duchess of cambridge had been admitted a few hours earlier. at 5:30, the call came through. she answered it and was taken in by the callers impersonation of the queen. she put it through to a second nurse who was monitoring the duchess. according to the hospital, nurses saldanha had not been disciplined or suspended. jacintha saldanha was married with two children. >> now to the economic deadline facing the united states, which has global implications. it is a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. it will take place at the end of the year faction is not taken. right now there is a standoff which christine lagarde has warned u.s. lawmakers, they have a duty to solve. we sat down with her here in washington. >> christine lagarde, the
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fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1%
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less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in recession, would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not need that because recovery is fragile. we do not want to have this knock on affect on the fragile recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill as their negotiating? >> i would say focus on the real issue. the real issues for me are the supremacy of the united states
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and its leadership role in the world. the u.s. has an economic leadership in the world. it is a safe haven. to make sure -- the uncertainty has to be removed. if you have dealt with your own issues, and then you can help and advise, and then you can encourage. if you speak from a weak position, it is more difficult. >> you have warned about the risks of political games. what did you mean? >> please try to take a higher view and look at the broader horizon. u.s. leadership, the economy, from age you live -- geopolitical point of view. >> is that is what is happening? political games in washington? >> i have been a politician in a previous life and i know what it is like.
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there is a lot of posturing and the negotiating. i certainly hope that the practical views taken by the americans in general will prevail. >> are you talking at all with either side? you have your own experience in europe. >> there are big boys and they can negotiate without my help. >> imf chief christine lagarde. now to egypt where protesters gathered today rejecting president's morsi's call for dialogue is the vice president hinted a referendum on the draft constitution could be postponed if it was done in a legally acceptable way. georges in cairo and has been on the streets talking to protesters. >> a moment of private grief on
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a day of public emotion. this was the funeral service for three man creep -- that draws its inspiration from islamic principles. despite the call for calm, religious fervor and political determination make for a heavy mixture. he was at the square when the uprising was in full flow. she feels her compatriots have forgotten their liberal ideals. do you think they are wrong to oppose the president? >> i think everybody has the right to oppose the not to kill innocent people. why did we kill them? opposing challenge, did do not call him names and do not kill innocent people. >> it may have been innocent and now they have achieved her road status.
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>> what we are hearing is the language of martyrdom. forces of an elected government struck down by those who opposed it. it is another sign of how polarizing egypt is becoming. at the heart of the crisis is president morsi giving him self immunity. he has called a referendum on the constitution. tonight, thousands of activists gathered outside the presidential palace. in scenes reminiscent of what happened when hosni mubarak was toppled, the soldiers provided a photo opportunity. here they have their heroes and those they call martyrs. from all of them the same accusation, the revolution was hijacked. >> he has broken all of his mandate.
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he has put himself above ala. he has done everything to break down his legitimacy. >> a country was united about the dictatorship is now divided over how to replace it. bbc news, cairo. >> from egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping. today, hillary clinton reiterated that president aside departure would be crucial. jeremy has been to a prison in damascus were some of the fighters are being held. this is his report. >> the soundtrack of the damascus gate, shelling. the regime has the heavy guns. they are the first thing you hear in the morning and the last at nine.
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the regime is that the city center. armed rebels are in parts of the ring around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels to film to this, and any civilians who have not escaped, have been shelled in the last few days. they keep the rebels back from this strong. . bbc was invited in to visit the detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not allowed to see the cellblocks. human rights groups say torture happens here. they paraded six prisoners. they said they were not speaking underdressed. the governor said any doubters were making the wrong
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assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i
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asked if he had been tortured. two said there were part of a front which the americans might name as a terrorist group. i cannot vouch for what they said. one repeated how well they had been looked after. but a trip to district 86 in damascus explains why the regime rests them. how whites -- allowites linda into a flat's wracked by a car bomb. his sister was one of 15 killed. she blames jihad this -- jihadists. diplomats say they do operate in syria as a small part of the armed rebellion. it is turning lives upside-down and ending them. it is impossible to say what is
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going through the mind of the president but what is certain is that his regime is under more pressure now than at any time since the uprising against him started in march last year. abc news, damascus. >> for more on the handling of the crisis in egypt and syria, i spoke with correspondent david of the new york times. it seems it is overflowing with crisis of the moment. now you have egypt and syria. where can the administration exert influence? >> there is not a lot of influence they can exert right now. i think they believe there is probably a tipping. at this moment and they are doing whatever they can to push him out and you heard secretary clinton talk about that.
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but they have some concerns, not only about whether he leaves, but what happens as he goes. the question at least asked, but it is being asked in this case, then what? and the biggest concern is the chemical weapons because if they fell into the wrong hands, al qaeda and affiliates, has block, others, and you could have a problem that could spread. i think the question is, does it in code or exploited? >> you have written about how the use of chemical weapons it seems to be shifting. why is that happening? >> in august, president obama said his calculus would change if the chemical weapons were moved or if they were used. this week, we have heard many warnings against using them. it appears some have been worried -- lived and the bigger concern was that some may have
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been mixed into the form you could use for actually dropping them as a weapon. we do not know how urgent that problem is. there have been conflicting reports. certainly you have not heard president obama repeat the warning against using them. i think that is because they do not have a lot of leverage for getting in those places. they have to depend on surrogates. >> if you think where they have more leverage, with egypt, are they urging leaders to delay a vote on this constitution? >> it would seem they are urging the president to rethink the kind of declarations he made. he has been saying to the west, this is temporary and then he puts a constitutional change which would seem to be strong. the irony is that president obama, having contributed to
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helping push mubarak out, is now facing the same problem that his predecessors felt in dealing with mubarak himself, what to do you do when you need an allied? he was useful during the conversations with hamas a few weeks ago. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, have a billion dollars is hanging around? we have just the journey for you. get ready to pack for the men. -- the moon. aid workers in the southern philippines are trying to rescue people trapped in the mud and fled after a powerful typhoon. more than 500 are known to have died. close to four hundred are missing.
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evacuation centers are overflowing with people. more than 300 thousands have lost their homes. the country's president flew into an island and that survivors. the widespread damage and those trying to pick up the pieces. >> a life turned upside down. in the schools that have become the evacuation centers, they cannot take in the enormity of what has happened. they are reliant for the most basic supplies. >> we are hoping to get financial assistance. almost all the people have nothing to eat. >> their homes are damaged. many beyond repair. bridges have been destroyed. even the banana trees have not been scared. they were the main source of income for many. the philippine president came to
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see the extent of the devastation and promised to learn lessons from the disaster. >> i want to account for those who are still alive, to reach them as soon as possible. i want to know why this happened. i also want to see how we can avoid having it again. >> people want to know why it happened, too. they do not usually hit this part of the philistines. few are as strong as this one. right now, they do not have time or energy to think about a cause. it is hard enough just to get through the day. >> in northern ireland, two police officers have been injured. the unrest started earlier in the week in the response to a decision not to fly the union flag.
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here is our correspondent mark simpson. >> there has been trouble in the center again tonight. tension has been simmering in parts of northern island all week, with more than 20 police officers injured. this clash was quickly brought under control but it was another dangerous situation. it is not the image of belfast politicians wanted on the day hillary clinton came to visit. she has been here seven times before and knows that the peace process is not perfect. she has a message for those causing trouble on the streets. >> you must not use violence as a means of expressing those feelings. the only path forward is a peaceful, democratic one. >> nasa -- last night in london, police found a rocket launcher ready for use by dissident
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republicans. loyalists have been on the streets protesting about the decision by belfast to stop flying the union flag every day. death threats have been issued because her party supported the flag decision. after meeting hillary clinton, she spoke about the fear of being attacked. >> i will not let the decisions -- >> despite appeals for calm, the violence continues. protesters claim the peace process has made it less perdition say the removal of the flag proves it. the trouble is happening right in the heart of the city. this area is full of bars. normally it is full of partygoers. not tonight. the police have called in extra resources and it looks like they will need them.
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>> now to a song or a frank sinatra famously made. the private companies offering to fly you to the moon. to get there, you had better be willing to fork out to 1.2 $5 billion. this is 40 years after apollo 17 went to the moon. our correspondent has all of the details. >> december, 1972. nasa sense and astronauts to the moon for the last time. no one has been back since. >> one giant leap for private enterprise. >> some former employees have launched a new company. it says it will soon be offering commercial flight back to the surface. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s.-
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based, commercial lunar transportation system. >> this is the module they used 40 years ago and this is what they hope will take people there by 2020. the company says it will cost $1.4 billion. it will be open to corporations and wealthy individuals. countries like japan, south korea and south africa would be able to carry out research on the lunar surface. 40 years ago, only the resources of the u.s. could send an astronaut to them in. now there is no political will or the money to do it again. according one of the last man to be there, it will be the private sector from now one that will leave the way back. >> it will be an effort by private investors, obviously
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regulated and sanctioned by government, but managed by the private sector. i think government is it too inefficient to make the costs come down to the point of where it would be economic. >> some think the idea is too ambitious. >> they do not have the money. they do not have the hardware. i am skeptical on the time scale they are talking about this can go to a reality. >> the splash and of apollo 17 marked the end of an era of space exploration. some believe there will be another one, taking a new generation back to the moon and even beyond. >> amazing and expensive. that brings the show to a close. you confined updates on our web sites. from all of us here, thank you for watching.
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>> makes sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you?
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>> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
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- i love strawberries! and today we're going to the enchanted garden to pick some! and then we're going to learn how crayons are made at the crayon factory! i'm so glad you're coming with us! be right back! is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children
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for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. hood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪
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♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ - good morning, neighbour! (yawning) strrrretch with me! reach your hands up, like this! stretch, stretch, stretch. rrrah! that felt grr-ific! come on inside! morning, dad! - morning, daniel. oh, good morning, neighbour! look at my enchanted garden model. you see? it's a little copy of the real enchanted garden. - oooh. how did you get the pretend apples to stick on the trees? - aha. ♪ we gotta look a little closer to find out what we want to know ♪ - ♪ we gotta look a little closer to find out what we want to know ♪ look, i see little drips of glue next to the pretend apples.